The Brain Adds New Cells During Puberty To Help Navigate The Complex Social World Of Adulthood

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[Source: Medical News Today]

Two Michigan State University neuroscientists report in the current issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Scientists used to think the brain cells you’re born with are all you get. After studies revealed the birth of new brain cells in adults, conventional wisdom held that such growth was limited to two brain regions associated with memory and smell.

But in the past few years, researchers in MSU’s neuroscience program have shown that mammalian brains also add cells during puberty in the amygdala and interconnected regions where it was thought no new growth occurred. The amygdala plays an important role in helping the brain make sense of social cues. For hamsters, it picks up signals transmitted by smell through pheromones; in humans, the amygdala evaluates facial expressions and body language.

Read the Rest of this Article on Medical News Today

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