Worth Repeating: XXX Syndrome: Early Learning and Sensory Developmental Implications

Pin It

[Source: Special Education Advisor]

By Susan N. Schriber Orloff, OTR/L

This rare but potentially devastating condition affects girls born to older mothers.  And as we as OT’s working in schools and preschools have already observed, many of our “first time moms” are often in their late thirties and early forties.

It is not a given that all older moms give birth to children with issues.  But in the case of XXX Syndrome that is one of the prominent factors.  XXX Syndrome is characterized by the presence of an additional X chromosome in each cell of female children/fetus.  If the extra X chromosome occurs only in some of the cells it is called a mosaic, and has less developmental impact.  It is not an inherited condition and usually occurs during conception and is related to a delayed or incomplete splitting of the egg during fertilization.  Occurrence is about 1 in 1,000.

XXX Syndrome can be mild to severe in its developmental impact. These children are often very tall, have vertical skin folds in the corners of their eyes, delayed motor skills, speech and language difficulties and various associated learning disabilities.  Other issues include social skill issues, self-esteem and related personality and psychological issues.

In preschool, these little girls “look” like their peers but just seem a “bit off”.  Following directions, engaging in-group tasks, frustration with following verbal directions and creative activities are often difficult for these children. In addition these children are often very dependent upon the teacher or authority figure for guidance and demonstrate little independent initiative.  It is as if, at a very early age they have learned that they cannot “go it alone”.  Behaviors are often unpredictable with the exhibition of task aversion in one situation and the ready engagement in another.

Read the Rest of This Article on Special Education Advisor.com

This entry was posted in OT and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.