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Autism Research Finds Empirical Link Between Multisensory Integration And Autism - featured August 23, 2010

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[Source: Medical News Today]

A new study by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University has provided concrete evidence that children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) process sensory information such as sound, touch and vision differently than typically developing children.

The study, which appears in the August 17 online issue of Autism Research, supports decades of clinical and anecdotal observations that individuals with ASD have difficulty coping with multiple sources of sensory information. The Einstein finding offers new insights into autism and could lead to objective measures for evaluating the effectiveness of autism therapies.

"One of the classic presentations of autism is the child in the corner with his hands over his ears rocking back and forth trying to block out the environment," said senior author Sophie Molholm, Ph.D., associate professor in the Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience and of pediatrics. "People have long theorized that these children might not be integrating information across the senses very well. If you have all these sights and sounds coming at you but you can't put them together in a meaningful way, the world can be an overwhelming place."

Read the Rest of this Article on Medical News Today


Tags: News of the Week Autism Newsletter 27 August 2010