Contact Us

Brain Imaging Study Of Preschoolers With ADHD Detects Brain Differences Linked To Symptoms - featured July 12, 2011

< Back to Previous Page

[Source: Science Daily.com]

In a study published June 9th in the Clinical Neuropsychologist, researchers from the Kennedy Krieger Institute found differences in the brain development of preschool children with symptoms of Attention-deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Results showed the region of the brain important for cognitive and motor control was smaller in these children than in typically developing children. Novel for its use of neuroimaging in very young, preschool age children with early symptoms of ADHD, this study's examination of brain differences may offer new insights into potential early interventions for the disorder.

ADHD is the single most common child behavioral diagnosis, affecting approximately 2 million children. This highly prevalent developmental disorder is characterized by inattentiveness, hyperactivity and impulsivity. By age 4, as many as 40 percent of children have sufficient problems with attention to be of concern to parents and preschool teachers. This observation is important, as children whose symptoms begin in early childhood are at high risk for academic failure and grade repetition.

Read the Rest of this Article on Science Daily.com

Tags: News of the Week ADHD Newsletter 15 July 2011