Children Who Spend Three-Quarters of Their Time in Sedentary Behavior Have Up to Nine Times Poorer Motor Coordination Than Active Peers

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Editor’s Note:  Here is another big surprising study (not) you can print off for your families to read.

[Source:  Science Daily]

Children who spend more than three-quarters of their time engaging in sedentary behaviour, such as watching TV and sitting at computers, have up to nine times poorer motor coordination than their more active peers, reveals a study published in the American Journal of Human Biology.

The study, involving Portuguese children, found that physical activity alone was not enough to overcome the negative effect of sedentary behaviour on basic motor coordination skills such as walking, throwing or catching, which are considered the building blocks of more complex movements.

“Childhood is a critical time for the development of motor coordination skills which are essential for health and well-being,” said lead author Dr Luis Lopes, from the University of Minho. “We know that sedentary lifestyles have a negative effect on these skills and are associated with decreased fitness, lower self-esteem, decreased academic achievement and increased obesity.”

Read the Rest of this Article on Science Daily

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One Response to Children Who Spend Three-Quarters of Their Time in Sedentary Behavior Have Up to Nine Times Poorer Motor Coordination Than Active Peers

  1. Brandi Cash Sutherland says:

    I wonder what age groups here were studied. The reason is that in America, people make best efforts at getting their kids started in school at very early ages. With children then starting “school” at apporx. age 3 that would encourage a more sedentary lifestyle just by having been in “school”. If a first grader is in school where he gets very limited outdoor or active play would this not contribute to this 3/4 of a day sedentary lifestyle? I would just like to hear more specifics about this study. It makes me wonder also why they would do a study of Portuguese children and apply it to the lives of American children. I’m not being ENTIRELY critical of the article, just curious as to the specifics of the study as well as how it applies to kids in the US. I mean, its common sense that if you spend 3/4 of your day sitting your motor skills will decline. I would also like to see in the study how many of the children were unable to regain those motor skills once they became more active. That does not seems physiologically possible if given an appropriate amount of stimulation. Oh my…I could go on and on.