Hot Job: School Based Contract OT – DuPage County, IL

villaparkWe are working with a school district in DuPage County who is in need of an OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST to work full time for the 2015 school year.  You will work between a few schools in close proximity in the Villa Park and Addison areas.    Caseload consists of one middle school and two high school with some transitional kids.   Contract rates commensurate with experience.

Qualifications: Must hold appropriate Degree in Occupational Therapy; a current state license (or eligible) if applicable.

Pediatric therapy is our specialty – and our expertise is backed by excellent hourly rates and per diem offered based upon IRS eligibility. Additional benefits include: nationally recognized medical insurance, 401K, generous relocation and continuing education assistance, optional summer pay program, and reimbursement for state licensure and/or teacher certifications.

Our management team provides 24/7-telephone support to our therapists – you are not alone when you are on assignment with us. In addition, we provide Clinical Coordinators to assist our therapists in managing their caseloads effectively. Our Clinical Coordinators are experienced therapists who have excelled within their profession and are able to help you succeed. Respond now and learn how YOU can be a part of our team! There is never a charge to applicants and new graduates are always encouraged to apply.

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School Psychology Corner: Is Anxiety Really a Gift?

boyle[Source:  Brain Blogger.com]

by Sherianna Boyle MEd, CAGS

Anxiety is most known as a “thinking” disorder which can be evidenced through symptoms such as chronic worrying. Science now shows that human beings have on average between 60,000 and 70,000 thoughts per day and according to author Joe Dispenza, roughly “70% of those thoughts are negative in nature.” Negative thoughts create negative emotions which over time neurologically create redundant behaviors such as rushing, nervousness, preoccupation with the future as well as the past. How is it then, that anxiety could be a gift?

The truth is the actual symptoms itself may not be a gift, however the experience of the symptoms are. It turns out thoughts and emotions are made up of energy. They are simply molecules and atoms in motion. These send off a vibrational frequency. When the frequency is low (has little movement) this corresponds to low level emotions such as fear, insecurity and guilt. When the frequency is high (more movement) this corresponds to higher emotions such as courage, love and appreciation. This information has been scientifically tested and validated by scientists and clinicians such as Dr. David Hawkins.

Read the Rest of this Article on Brain Blogger

 


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Preeclampsia During Pregnancy Raises Autism Risk

[Source: CBS News]

preeclampsia

As autism rates continue to rise in the U.S., researchers are searching for reasons why. Even though children don’t typically show signs of autism until a few years after birth, some of the most significant risk factors may actually be encountered in-utero.

A new study finds children born to mothers who had preeclampsia during pregnancy are as much as twice as likely to develop autism spectrum disorder.

Preeclampsia is a complication during pregnancy in which a mother develops high blood pressure and often kidney damage. The symptoms can come on suddenly, typically late in her second trimester or early in the third. The condition, which affects approximately 5 to 8 percent of all pregnancies, can be fatal to a mother if left untreated.

The latest research indicates that the sicker a mother was with the disease, the more likely autism may occur in their child.

Read the Rest of this Article on CBS News.com


Posted in Behavior Analyst, OT, Psych, School Nursing, SLP, Special Ed | Tagged , , ,

Delay Cutting Umbilical Cord Two Minutes for Better Newborn Development

[Source:  Science Daily]

sciencedaily

A study conducted by University of Granada scientists (from the Physiology, Obstetrics and Gynaecology Departments) and from the San Cecilio Clinical Hospital (Granada) has demonstrated that delaying the cutting of the umbilical cord in newborns by two minutes leads to a better development of the baby during the first days of life.This multidisciplinary work, published in the journal Pediatrics reveals that the time in cutting the umbilical cord (also called umbilical cord clamping) influences the resistance to oxidative stress in newborns.

For this research, scientists worked with a group of 64 healthy pregnant women who went into labour in the San Cecilio Clinical Hospital in Granada. They all had a normal pregnancy and spontaneous vaginal delivery. Half of the newborns had their umbilical cord cut 10 seconds after delivery, whereas the other half had it cut after two minutes.

Beneficial effect

The results of this research suggest that there are beneficial effects in the late clamping of the umbilical cord: there was an increase in the antioxidant capacity of mature newborns and there was moderation of inflammatory effects in the case of induced delivery.

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Memory Formation in Fragile X Syndrome Strengthened by Multiple, Short Learning Sessions

[Source:  Medical News Today]

uciayala

A learning technique that maximizes the brain’s ability to make and store memories may help overcome cognitive issues seen in fragile X syndrome, a leading form of intellectual disability, according to UC Irvine neurobiologists.

Christine Gall, Gary Lynch and colleagues found that fragile X model mice trained in three short, repetitious episodes spaced one hour apart performed as well on memory tests as normal mice. These same fragile X rodents performed poorly on memory tests when trained in a single, prolonged session – which is a standard K-12 educational practice in the U.S.

“These results are dramatic and never seen before. Fragile X model mice trained using this method had memory scores equal to those of control animals,” said Gall, professor of anatomy & neurobiology and neurobiology & behavior. “Our findings suggest an easily implemented, noninvasive strategy for treating an important component of the cognitive problems found in patients with fragile X syndrome.”

Fragile X syndrome is an inherited genetic condition that causes intellectual and developmental disabilities and is commonly associated with autism. Symptoms include difficulty learning new skills or information.

It’s been known since classic 19th century educational psychology studies that people learn better when using multiple, short training episodes rather than one extended session.

Read the Rest of this Article on Medical News Today

 


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