Activity of the Week: Lego Picture Puzzles

legopuzzle[Source:  I Can Teach My Child]

We have had so much fun with these LEGO picture puzzles!  The boys and I just laughed and laughed at the combinations they created.  And the LEGO “puzzles” took only a few minutes to make once I had the pictures developed!

Here’s what you’ll need:  LEGO Duplos, Double-sided tape, an Xacto knife, and photos of your kids, family members, or friends!

This would work best if you take the pictures in the same location and you have the camera the same distance away from the child.  Also, when you trim the photos to fit on the Duplos, make sure the child is centered.  I didn’t do a perfect job of this, so they aren’t as cool as they could be…but we still have had fun with them!

Learn More on I Can Teach My Child!


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Babies Can Think Before They Can Speak

[Source: Science Daily]

thinkbeforespeak

Two pennies can be considered the same — both are pennies, just as two elephants can be considered the same, as both are elephants. Despite the vast difference between pennies and elephants, we easily notice the common relation of sameness that holds for both pairs.

Analogical ability — the ability to see common relations between objects, events or ideas — is a key skill that underlies human intelligence and differentiates humans from other apes.

While there is considerable evidence that preschoolers can learn abstract relations, it remains an open question whether infants can as well. In a new Northwestern University study, researchers found that infants are capable of learning the abstract relations of same and different after only a few examples.

“This suggests that a skill key to human intelligence is present very early in human development, and that language skills are not necessary for learning abstract relations,” said lead author Alissa Ferry, who conducted the research at Northwestern.

Read the Rest of this Article on Science Daily


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Pets Reduce Stress In Kids With Autism, Study Finds

Editor’s Note:  We knew this but its great to see the evidence!

[Source: Disability Scoop]

pets

Animals may offer more than comfort for kids with autism, according to new research finding that pets can bring about physiological changes in those with the developmental disorder.

Children on the spectrum displayed a sharp drop in anxiety and social stress when playing with animals as compared to engaging in other activities whether independently or with their peers, the study found.

By contrast, typically-developing kids actually exhibited a rise in skin conductance levels — which were used to measure anxiety — when presented with animals, perhaps due to excitement, the researchers said in their findings published recently in the journal Developmental Psychobiology.

“Previous studies suggest that in the presence of companion animals, children with autism spectrum disorders function better socially,” said James Griffin of the National Institutes of Health’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, which helped fund the new research. “This study provides physiological evidence that the proximity of animals eases the stress that children with autism may experience in social situations.”

Read the Rest of this Article on Disability Scoop


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SLP Corner: The Posterior Tongue Tie and Feeding Challenges

tongueout2

[Source:  ASHAsphere]

by Melanie Potock

In a March 2015 post titled Just Flip the Lip, we explored how the band of tissue or “frenum” that attaches the upper lip to gum tissue can affect feeding development if the frenum is too restrictive. Today, we’ll focus on the lingual frenal attachment that is the easiest to miss: The posterior tongue tie (sometimes referred to as a submucosal tongue tie), a form of ankyloglossia.

Consider that the normal lingual frenum inserts at about midline, just under the tongue and down to the floor of the mouth allowing free range of movement and oral motor skill development. While many pediatric professionals are familiar with a tongue-tie when the frenum attaches closer to the tongue tip (where it’s visible when the tip is gently lifted), the posterior tongue tie requires a specific technique to view. According to Bobby Ghaheri, an ENT surgeon who specializes in treating ankyloglossia, whether anterior or posterior terminology is used, the focus should be on function. As he describes in this article, many anterior ties also include a posterior restriction and releasing just the thin membrane is not always adequate for full tongue function necessary for feeding. The frenum, if visible at all, may appear short and thick, but is often buried in the in the mucosal covering of the tongue.

Read the Rest of this Article on ASHAsphere


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Parents’ Corner: Dear Teachers of The Little Ones with Special Needs

[Source:  From the Bowels of Motherhood via Autism Speaks]

dearparents

by Mandy Farmer

I don’t know your background.  I don’t know why you chose this profession.  I don’t know where your inner strength comes from or what keeps you going.  I don’t know if you will keep doing this or if you will move on to other jobs.  I don’t know how much of your day you take home with you at night.

But this is what I do know:

I know you care for our children as if they were your own.  I know you celebrate every single little success they have, because you know just how hard and long they had to work to achieve it.  I know you watch them develop and your hopes for them go far beyond your classroom.

I know you hear the same news stories I do.  I know you cringe when you hear of a teacher who hurt a nonverbal child.  I know your heart aches that you have to work so hard to earn parents’ trust and you wish they knew that for every one abusive teacher of special needs children there are a hundred more that would do anything and everything to protect our children.  And because you are that teacher who would do anything to protect these kids, you have no problem earning our children’s trust and earning our trust.

I know you have hard days.  I know you juggle the needs of many children at once and have to work constantly to maintain the peace in the classroom.  I know you stay up late working on things for the next day and stay at work late to make sure your classroom is “just so” for tomorrow.  I know you have to work harder than your fellow teachers who teach typical children to think ahead for the day and to try to see and prevent potential triggers and obstacles that might make our children’s days that much harder.  I know the hard days have been physical, but you press on, you don’t lose your cool and you hope tomorrow will be better.

Read the  Rest of this Article on Autism Speaks


Posted in Deaf Education / Interpreting, OT, Psych, PT, SLP, Special Ed | Tagged , , , , , , ,