Hot Job! School based Occupational Therapist – McHenry, IL

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We are working with a school district in McHenry County who is in need of an OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST to work full time at one elementary school in the McHenry area.  This is a great position for a new OT or one with many years of practice.  You’ll join a supportive team in a fun environment and have the benefit of competitive contract pay and benefits.

Qualifications: Must hold appropriate Degree in Occupational Therapy; a current state license (or eligible) if applicable.   
Pediatric therapy is our specialty – and our expertise is backed by excellent hourly rates and per diem offered based upon IRS eligibility. Additional benefits include: nationally recognized medical insurance, 401K, generous relocation and continuing education assistance, optional summer pay program, and reimbursement for state licensure and/or teacher certifications.

Our management team provides 24/7-telephone support to our therapists – you are not alone when you are on assignment with us. In addition, we provide Clinical Coordinators to assist our therapists in managing their caseloads effectively. Our Clinical Coordinators are experienced therapists who have excelled within their profession and are able to help you succeed. Respond now and learn how YOU can be a part of our team! There is never a charge to applicants and new graduates are always encouraged to apply.

Apply for This Job Today!


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Kids’ Poor Decision-Making May Predict Teen Issues

[Source: Psych Central]

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A new study suggests a display of poor decision making during primary school increases the risk of interpersonal and behavioral difficulties during adolescence.

However, experts view decision-making as a skill and something that can be taught during youth.

Joshua Weller, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the School of Psychological Science at Oregon State University found that when a 10 or 11 year-old shows poor judgment, the potential for high-risk health behavior in their teen years escalates.

“These findings suggest that less-refined decision skills early in life could potentially be a harbinger for problem behavior in the future,” said Weller.

If poor decision-making patterns can be identified while children are still young, intervention to improve skills can be effective.

Read the Rest of this Article on Psych Central

 


Posted in Behavior Analyst, Psych, Special Ed | Tagged , , ,

New Halloween Tradition for Children with Allergies: The Teal Pumpkin Project

tealpumpkinThis Halloween, Food Allergy Research and Education, (FARE) is encouraging communities to start a new tradition that will help make this holiday season less scary for children with food allergies: the Teal Pumpkin Project. This campaign encourages people to raise awareness of food allergies by providing non-food treats for trick-or-treaters and painting a pumpkin teal – the color of food allergy awareness – to place in front of their house along with a free printable sign from FARE to indicate they have non-food treats available.

The Teal Pumpkin Project is designed to promote safety, inclusion and respect of individuals managing food allergies – and to keep Halloween a fun, positive experience for all.

Learn More About This Terrific New Program!


Posted in OT, Psych, SLP, Special Ed | Tagged , , ,

Better Academic Support in High School Crucial for Low Performers with ADHD

[Source: Medical News Today]

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New research reveals that high school students with attention-deficit / hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are using an unexpectedly high rate of services for their age group, yet many low achievers with ADHD are not getting the academic supports they need. Scientists from UNC’s Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute (FPG) and several other universities published the findings in School Mental Health after examining data for a large national sample of high school students with ADHD.

Desiree W. Murray, FPG scientist and lead author of the study, said previous studies have demonstrated that children with ADHD often have difficulty completing work and performing at the level of their actual academic ability.

“Prior research has shown that students with ADHD score 10-30 points lower than their peers on achievement tests, and 30 percent repeat a grade,” explained Murray. “High school students with ADHD take lower level classes and fail more courses than their peers.”

Read the Rest of this Article on Medical News Today


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Early Intervention Could Boost Education Levels

[Source: Science Daily]

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Taking steps from an early age to improve childhood education skills could raise overall population levels of academic achievement by as much as 5%, and reduce socioeconomic inequality in education by 15%, according to international research led by the University of Adelaide.

In a study now published in the journal Child Development, researchers from the University of Adelaide’s School of Population Health and colleagues at the University of Bristol in the UK have modelled the likely outcomes of interventions to improve academic skills in children up to school age. They considered what effect these interventions would have on education by age 16.

Lead author Dr Catherine Chittleborough from the University of Adelaide says socioeconomic disadvantage is a known risk factor for education and related outcomes.

“Childhood socioeconomic disadvantage is associated with reduced ability to benefit from schooling, poorer educational outcomes, a lower likelihood of continuing to tertiary education, and less job success. A poor education is associated with increased welfare dependence and lower skilled jobs with lower pay, helping to continue the cycle of disadvantage,” Dr Chittleborough says.

“We’ve known for some time that intervening before the age of five can improve skills necessary for educational success, but the effect of these interventions on socioeconomic inequalities has remained unknown,” she says.

Read the Rest of this Article on Science Daily


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